Your browser does not support Javascript
email@mymsaa.org
Multiple Sclerosis Association of America Logo
Link to FaceBook Link to Twitter Link to YouTube Link to Pinterest
Register Why Register Contact MSAA Site Preferences Print Page Home
Tagline Image
Donate Button
The Motivator iconMSAA's MAGAZINE
The Motivator
Booklets and Brochures iconBooklets & Brochures
MS Research Update 2014
MS Research Update 2013
About MS
Medicare Planning
and Multiple Sclerosis
The Affordable Care Act
and Multiple Sclerosis
Aquatic Exercise and Multiple Sclerosis:
A Guide for Patients
How to S.E.A.R.C.H.™ for the Right
MS Therapy for You!
Understanding and Treating
MS Relapses
Solutions for Wellness: A Guide to
MSAA's Programs and Services -
Second Edition
The Multiple Sclerosis Association
of America Programs & Services
Guide in Spanish
Mommy's Story
Daddy's Story
Understanding and Treating
Depression in Multiple Sclerosis
MSAA Monograph: Thinking about
Complementary and Alternative
Medicine?
MSAA Monograph: The Confusing
World of Clinical Trials
Multiple Sclerosis and Cooling
(3rd edition)
Primary Progressive Multiple
Sclerosis: What You Need to Know
Order Publications iconOrder Publications
Individual Order
Group Orders



Home > MSAA Publications > The Motivator > The Motivator: Winter/Spring 2009 > Cover Story - Symptom Management Update > SECTION 4: BALANCE
Share this Page:
submit to reddit

< SECTION 3: WEAKNESS - Home - SECTION 5: DIZZINESS AND VERTIGO >

SECTION 4: BALANCE

Balance difficulties are common in MS, and can result from a combination of:
MS lesions in various areas of the brain that are involved in the control of movement; the presence of weakness, tremor, and fatigue in the muscles involved in walking; and by symptoms such as visual problems and numbness.

COMPENSATORY STRATEGIES

Treating other symptoms that affect balance, such as spasticity, weakness, and tremor, can be of help. Balance can also worsen from being "out of condition," and a physical therapist with experience in MS can design an exercise program and teach helpful techniques. Hippotherapy (therapeutic horseback riding) may improve balance as well. Some individuals may benefit from Ritalin ® (methylphenidate), which is a medication developed for attention deficit disorder. The usual dose for this oral medication is 10 to 60 mg daily, normally taken 30 to 45 minutes before eating -or as your physician directs. Because it may cause difficulty sleeping, it is recommended that you take your last dose before 6:00 pm.

< SECTION 3: WEAKNESS - Home - SECTION 5: DIZZINESS AND VERTIGO >

Last Updated on Friday, 10 May 2013 10:32