Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Medications


Symptoms - Multiple Sclerosis Symptom MedicationsA number of effective treatments are available to reduce the effects of most MS symptoms. Several drugs mentioned (in the listing to follow) are not specifically approved for MS by the United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA); however, doctors may prescribe these drugs "off-label" for some of their patients, if appropriate.

For example, Lyrica® (pregabalin) is a drug approved for seizures, fibromyalgia, and pain in diabetes and shingles. While it is not specifically approved for MS at this time, it is being prescribed by some doctors for certain types of pain and other MS symptoms. This drug is chemically related to Neurontin® (gabapentin), so neurologists may recommend Lyrica instead of Neurontin for certain patients.

To follow is a list of medications that may be prescribed or recommended by physicians for the treatment of MS symptoms. While this list includes many of the medications commonly prescribed for the individual symptoms noted, other drugs not appearing on the list may also be prescribed by a physician, depending on the specific circumstances and the doctor's preferences. Additionally, not all symptoms are included on this list; only those that may be treated with prescribed medications.

In addition to medications, other medical procedures and strategies may be used to help treat some of the symptoms of MS. For instance, moderate exercise and yoga, as approved by one's physician, can help to reduce fatigue. Various types of counseling can be an important component in treating depression, often in conjunction with a prescribed medication. Cognitive evaluation and intervention can assist individuals with memory and processing issues, while several types of therapies (including physical, occupational, and speech) can help with a host of movement, strength, coordination, and other symptoms that can affect one's quality of life and daily functioning. Individuals experiencing these types of symptoms should discuss treatment options with their physician.

Medical marijuana (cannabis) has been used experimentally in treating certain MS symptoms, such as pain or spasticity. Studies with MS patients and marijuana for symptom relief are limited and the results have been mixed. The medical use of marijuana is controversial since it has not been legalized nationally, but certain states have legalized its use by prescription through approved distribution centers. In June 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a new webpage, FDA and Marijuana, which provides information on the regulation of medical marijuana. It also explains the FDA's role and activities on its use for particular illnesses and its development through clinical trials. The FDA notes that the webpage will be updated as new information becomes available. Other helpful webpages from the FDA include FDA and Marijuana, Questions and Answers and Marijuana Research with Human Subjects.

One's doctor is the best source of information on treatments for a patient's individual situation. Patients who have questions about a drug or other symptom-management treatment should consult their physician. The drugs listed were originally compiled by Dr. Jack Burks, MSAA's chief medical officer.



Medications Listed by Symptom

Please note that not all symptoms are included in this list - only those with specific drug treatments available. For a full listing of symptoms associated with MS, please visit the Symptoms section of this website.


Anxiety


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Bladder Dysfunction


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Bowel Problems


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Cognitive Changes


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Depression


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Dizziness/Vertigo


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Fatigue


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Mobility and Walking


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Numbness


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Pain


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA)


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Sexual Dysfunction


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Spasticity (stiffness)


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Tremor


► Commonly Prescribed Medications


Weakness


► Commonly Prescribed Medications

 
Please note that MSAA does not endorse or recommend any specific drug or treatment. Individuals are advised to consult with a physician about the potential benefits and risks of the different treatment therapies.


► Introduction to Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Management

► MS Symptom Listing